What is the definition of a “wearables”?

I live in a wearable world. I have a startup built around wearables & data. It’s easy for me to understand what a wearable is, or is it? How do you explain to a smart normal person what “wearables” mean?

The other day one of my colleagues received exactly this comment (see below):

Screen Shot 2015-07-24 at 16.17.58

I think we are using a lot of terms in parallel nowadays. Specifically, fitness tracker, wearable devices, smartwatch, fitness band. All these refer to devices which you put on your wrist (unless you are creative and you put on other body parts…). I am going to try to provide a definition for each one of these term.

Fitness tracker

The History of Wearable Technology

 

More healthy news in your mailbox?

Stay up to date with our tips & tricks!
X

Review Fitbit Blaze

Alright. Let’s talk about the Fitbit Blaze. When I first saw the fitness tracker during a Super Bowl commercial, I thought “wow, that is a lot of money to present the world with an Apple Watch clone. However I liked the Apple Watch for certain things, so I was curious to lay my hands on a Fitbit Blaze. Also because I hadn’t tested a Fitbit in a long while and I was curious to see how much they’d improved over the course of time (the last one I tested was the Fitbit Surge)

The wins and fails of the Fitbit Blaze:

WIN: Set-up

The set-up of the Blaze goes smooth. You open up the app, it tells you what to do and within 3 minutes you’re Fitbit is up an running without much user interaction. Even when I notice I am wearing the wrong device, I can easily unpair it and pair another one to my app.

WIN: Different sizes

My wrists are tiny. It happens frequently that fitness trackers are too big and clunky (clearly not designed for tiny wristed women). I am positively surprised that I fit in the the Small as well as the Large fitness band.

FAIL: Failing automatic tracking of activities

Fitbit claims to track activity automatically. I hop on my bike and start biking to work, however my ride was never registered. I look into the details and the standard setting is that it start tracking activity after 15 min. Hmmm. That is a bummer, what about my commute bike ride? There is the option to start tracking it manually by tapping 4 times on the screen to find the right button. It reminds me of exactly what I hated about the Fitbit Surge.

FAIL: Limited activity goal setting

You can choose which goal you want to focus on with your Fitbit Blaze. Unfortunately the range of goals are very limited. There is no focus on sleep, heart rate, other activities besides steps…
If you’re a more advanced athlete or you’re not into walking then the Fitbit will not offer you much to help you reach your health & wellness goals.

FAIL: Too many options

The more mature Fitbit devices get, the more options start appearing in the app. I can choose to see how long I’ve been sitting down

FAIL: Challenges

I am a challenges kind of person. I’m all for competition. If a friend challenges me, I join

WIN: Losing weight program / goals

Fitbit finally offers people focussing on weight loss, a way to set a goal and keeping track of their calorie deficit. Now the exercise tracking & food tracking efforts come together in a dedicated goal.

WIN: good overview in Fitbit app

The Fitbit app offers a quick overview of your daily exercise, sleep, nutrition… stats. But it also offers a more in depth overview for the data crunchers.

WIN: Watch interface

The watch interface is a clock that shows the hour & your current steps number, heart rate… Through the Fitbit Blaze interface you can start the tracking of an activity like running, biking…
The nice part about it, is that it’s really easy to see your daily stats in a heartbeat.

FAIL: Sleep accuracy

Yesterday I fell asleep for half an hour. I woke up, got up and walked around before getting to bed again. However that first part of sleep was not recorded by my Fitbit.

FAIL: Standing hours

It’s great that Fitbit finally integrated the amount of hours you were sedentary into their stats & app, however they only count “a standing hour” if you walk 250 steps. Unfortunately my trips to the office kitchen are less than 250 steps and so I am sedentary almost the entire day, which is incorrect.

Keep yourself up-to-date. Get our newsletter!

Stay up to date with our tips & tricks in your inbox.
X